IBM buys Redhat in US$34 Billion deal

In one of the largest software M&A ever, IBM has paid US$34 billion in cash to acquire the Enterprise opensource OS company Redhat. The merger was announced few hours before and has come as a shock to many a companies.

This marks a new era in IBM’s cloud push, but what would be interesting is to watch how IBM would treat Redhat’s cash cow Redhat Enterprise Linux. Will it let Redhat run as an independent entity or start tightly coupling it with IBM’s Power cpu architecture.

You can read more on the news in the link below:

https://www.businessinsider.com.au/ibm-is-reportedly-nearing-a-deal-to-acquire-redhat-the-software-company-valued-at-20-billion-2018-10?r=US&IR=Tred_hat_logo

 

Configure Passwordless SSH on Multiple Servers and Execute Commands on Multiple servers in Linux

1. On Server 1 (192.168.1.67)

ssh-keygen -t rsa

cd .ssh/

scp -r id_rsa.pub root@192.168.1.68:/root/.ssh/authorized_keys

2. On Server 2 (192.168.1.68)

ssh-keygen -t rsa

cd .ssh

cat id_rsa.pub >> authorized_keys

3. Send Server 2 authorized key to Server 1 (192.168.1.67)

scp -r authorized_keys root@192.168.1.67:/root/.ssh
4. Test from server 1

ssh root@192.168.1.68

Test from Server 2

ssh root@192.168.1.67
5. On Server 3 (192.168.1.69)

ssh-keygen -t rsa

cd .ssh

cat id_rsa.pub >> authorized_keys
6. On Server 4 (192.168.1.70)

ssh-keygen -t rsa

cd .ssh

cat id_rsa.pub >> authorized_keys

7. 5. On Server 5 (192.168.1.71)

ssh-keygen -t rsa

cd .ssh

cat id_rsa.pub >> authorized_keys

8. 5. On Server 6 (192.168.1.72)

ssh-keygen -t rsa

cd .ssh

cat id_rsa.pub >> authorized_keys

9. Now on Server 1  192.168.1..67

create a file called hosts.txt in /root directory, and save the ips of the below host

192.168.1.68
1192.168.1.69
192.168.1.70
192.168.1.71
192.168.1.72

To excute a remote command on all the hosts from server 1 run below command :

— Run Single Command —

for host in $(cat hosts.txt); do ssh “$host” “date” > “output.$host”; done
— Run Multiple Commands —

for host in $(cat hosts.txt); do ssh “$host” “uname -a && date && df -h” > “output.$host”; done

#Double-ampersands will execute the next command only if the preceding command exits with a status of zero. In the below example,

for host in $(cat hosts.txt); do ssh “$host” “uname -a ; date ; df -h” > “output.$host”; done

#Semi-colons will execute all commands regardless of exit status. In the below example, all three commands will be run.

# In short: double-ampersands should be used if the commands depend on each other, semi-colons should be used if they don’t.