Guaranteed Restore Points Oracle 11g

Guaranteed Restore Points are a life-saver when it comes to Application changes.It can ensure that you can rewind the database to a time without tradional point in time recovery. Guaranteed restore points are basically alias’es for SCN’s

A normal restore point assigns a restore point name to an SCN or specific point in time.The control file can maintain a record of thousands of normal restore points with no significant effect on database performance. Normal restore points eventually age out of the control file if not manually deleted, so they require no ongoing maintenance.

SQL> CREATE RESTORE POINT before_upgrade;

Creating a normal restore point eliminates manually recording an SCN in advance or determine the correct SCN after the fact by using features such as Flashback Query.

Like a normal restore point, a guaranteed restore point serves as an alias for an SCN in recovery operations. A principal difference is that guaranteed restore points never age out of the control file and must be explicitly dropped. In general, you can use a guaranteed restore point as an alias for an SCN with any command that works with a normal restore point. Except as noted, the information about where and how to use normal restore points applies to guaranteed restore points as well.

A guaranteed restore point ensures that you can use Flashback Database to rewind a database to its state at the restore point SCN, even if the generation of flashback logs is disabled. If flashback logging is enabled, then a guaranteed restore point enforces the retention of flashback logs required for Flashback Database to any SCN after the earliest guaranteed restore point.

This example shows how to create a guaranteed restore point:

SQL> CREATE RESTORE POINT before_upgrade GUARANTEE FLASHBACK DATABASE;

Listing Restore Points
______________________

You can use the LIST command to list either a specific restore point or all restore points known to the RMAN repository. The variations of the command are as follows:

LIST RESTORE POINT restore_point_name;
LIST RESTORE POINT ALL;

RMAN indicates the SCN and time of the restore point, the type of restore point, and the name of the restore point. The following example shows sample output:

RMAN> LIST RESTORE POINT ALL;

using target database control file instead of recovery catalog
SCN              RSP Time  Type       Time      Name
—————- ——— ———- ——— —-
341859           28-JUL-06            28-JUL-06 NORMAL_RS
343690           28-JUL-06 GUARANTEED 28-JUL-06 GUARANTEED_RS

To see a list of all currently defined restore points (normal and guaranteed), use the V$RESTORE_POINT control file view, by means of the following query:

SQL> SELECT NAME, SCN, TIME, DATABASE_INCARNATION#,
GUARANTEE_FLASHBACK_DATABASE,STORAGE_SIZE
FROM V$RESTORE_POINT

Dropping Restore Points
_______________________

When you are satisfied that you do not need an existing restore point, or when you want to create a new restore point with the name of an existing restore point, you can drop the restore point, using the DROP RESTORE POINT SQL*Plus statement. For example:

SQL> DROP RESTORE POINT before_app_upgrade;
Restore point dropped.

The same statement is used to drop both normal and guaranteed restore points.

Note:
Normal restore points eventually age out of the control file, even if not explicitly dropped.
Guaranteed restore points never age out of the control file. They remain until they are explicitly dropped.

Flashing back database till Restore Point
_________________________________________

Login to RMAN and bring the database to mount mode.

FLASHBACK DATABASE TO RESTORE POINT ‘before_upgrade’;

FLASHBACK DATABASE TO SCN 202381;

Open the database.

I normally create guaranteed retore points before doing a Dataguard switchover. It helps you assure you can go back to the state before you started (in case anything goes wrong).

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